Facebook Feed

JOHN GAGNÉ (Sydney), Paper, Time, and Oblivion in Premodern Europe

Thursday 16 November, 5 pm, Board Room, Faculty of English

This presentation proposes that Europe’s adoption of writing paper in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries came with a sensibility, one profoundly connected to paper’s materiality. All inscribable media carry within their very matter a relationship to time. Parchment had served for centuries to record indispensable information for the long term; wax tablets, by contrast, were often erased within hours or days. Paper was asked to perform both duties – it was a medium both for now and forever. This talk explores the tension between paper’s durability and disposability in the centuries between 1250 and 1650.

John Gagné is Lecturer in History at the University of Sydney. Before moving to Australia in 2010, he was a postdoctoral fellow in Montréal with the “Making Publics, 1500-1700” project, devoted to “Media, Markets, and Associations in Early Modern Europe.” His current research explores histories of politics and war around the year 1500 with a focus on intercultural contacts, material culture, and gender. Recently-published essays consider the relationship between print and female sanctity; cultures of casualty-counting in premodern war; prosthetic iron hands; and histories of document destruction and degradation.

If you’d like to join the speaker for dinner after the seminar, please email jes1003
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

THURSDAY 16 NOVEMBER, 5 pm, Board Room, Faculty of English

JOHN GAGNÉ (Sydney), Paper, Time, and Oblivion in Premodern Europe

This presentation proposes that Europe’s adoption of writing paper in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries came with a sensibility, one profoundly connected to paper’s materiality. All inscribable media carry within their very matter a relationship to time. Parchment had served for centuries to record indispensable information for the long term; wax tablets, by contrast, were often erased within hours or days. Paper was asked to perform both duties – it was a medium both for now and forever. This talk explores the tension between paper’s durability and disposability in the centuries between 1250 and 1650.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Parker Library on the Web 2.0

Symposium, 16th March 2018
Corpus Christi College, Cambridge

Call for Papers

The Parker Library is pleased to invite contributions to a symposium celebrating the launch of its newly redesigned online platform. It will be an occasion to reflect on the impact of the digital humanities on manuscript studies, bringing together graduate students, researchers, and library professionals who work with or on manuscript books.

Thanks to a collaboration with Stanford University, Parker Library on the Web 2.0 will be live in January 2018, presenting new features such as IIIF compatibility, user-based transcription bubbles, a Mirador interface allowing comparison with other digitised resources, and an updated Zotero-linked bibliography accompanying each manuscript. The website will also be released under a Creative-Commons Non-Commercial Licence,
meaning that all of the images provided on Parker Library on the Web 2.0 will be free for download and personal study.

To weigh the potential and the implications of such a platform, the symposium will address questions about the methodologies used in the study of medieval manuscripts, how digitised surrogates and online tools influence our understanding of material objects, book circulation, and textual transmission, and how digital initiatives assist in the curation and preservation of physical collections. Whilst we encourage papers focusing
on Parker manuscripts, we warmly welcome proposals discussing material hosted on similar platforms, such as (but not limited to) the Biblioteca Apostolica Vaticana, Biblissima, and the Digital Bodleian.

The symposium will take place in the Parker Library itself on 16th March 2018, and will feature an exhibition on some of its most famous treasures. Proposals of a maximum of 500 words for 20-minute papers should be submitted to Carlotta Barranu
(cb841@cam.ac.uk) by 15th January 2018.
... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

www.theguardian.com/culture/2017/nov/03/scurrilous-manuscript-that-could-have-undone-john-donne-d... ... See MoreSee Less

View on Facebook

Comments are closed.