Dr Andrew Taylor, Churchill

 

 

Biographical Information

Andrew Taylor is Fellow, Lecturer and Director of Studies in English at Churchill College. He completed his Ph.D. at Trinity College, Cambridge, and held a Junior Research Fellowship, then College Lectureship there before starting at Churchill in 2006.

Research Interests

My research interests are broadly in humanism and sixteenth-century writing; the poetry of the early Tudor Renaissance; English and Latin translation, and the literary interplay between these languages; humanist epistolography; Erasmus; biblical and patristic scholarship in the early Reformation; the history of the book. I am currently editing the English translations of Ovid's Heroides and Tristia for Volume 2 of Ovid in English 1485-1625, and working on a book-length project on humanism and translation in the English renaissance, with particular interests in the works of John Cheke, John Christopherson and Laurence Humphrey.

Areas of Graduate Supervision

I welcome inquiries relating to my research interests above.

Selected Publications

  • ‘Biblical Humanism’, in The Oxford Handbook of Neo-Latin, ed. Sarah Knight and Stefan Tilg (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2015), 295-312.
  • Neo-Latin and Translation in the Renaissance, ed. and intro. Andrew Taylor, Canadian Review of Comparative Literature / Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée, 41.4 (2014): 'The Translations of Renaissance Latin', 329-53.
  • 'How to hold your tongue: John Christopherson's Plutarch and the mid-Tudor politics of Catholic humanism', Canadian Review of Comparative Literature / Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée, 41.4 (2014), 386-406.
  • Ovid in English 1485-1625, 2 vols, ed. Sarah Annes Brown and Andrew Taylor, MHRA Tudor and Stuart Translations: Volume I: Metamorphoses; Volume II: Poetry of Love and Exile (London: Modern Humanities Research Association, 2013 (I) and forthcoming c. 2016 (II)).
  • ‘Textual Transaction and Transformation in the Renaissance Latin Book’, in Brill's Encyclopaedia of the Neo-Latin World, ed. Jan Bloemendal, Charles Fantazzi, Philip Ford† and Arjan van Dijk (Leiden: Brill, 2014), 217-38. Micropaedia entries on: Erasmus's Adagia; Thomas More's Utopia; Aldus Manutius and the Aldine Press; Print and Pedagogy; the Typography of Renaissance Humanism.
  • 'Suffering and scholarship: The contexts of Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey's Ecclesiastes', Translation and Literature, 22.2 (2013), 167-81.
  • The Early Modern Cultures of Neo-Latin Drama, ed. and intro. Philip Ford and Andrew Taylor, Supplementa Humanistica Lovaniensia, XXXII (2013).
  • ‘John Leland’s communities of the epigram’, in Neo-Latin Poetry in the British Isles, ed. L. B. T. Houghton and Gesine Manuwald (London: Bloomsbury Academic, 2012), 15-35.
  • ‘Humanist Philology and Reformation Controversy: John Christopherson’s Latin Translations of Philo Judaeus and Eusebius of Caesarea’, in Tudor Translation, ed. Fred Schurink, Early Modern Literature in History (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 79-100.
  • ‘“In stede of harme inestimable good”: A Dialogue of Comfort against Tribulation’, in The Cambridge Companion to Thomas More, ed. George M. Logan (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2011), 216-38.
  • ‘Ad omne virtutum genus? Mary between Piety, Pedagogy, and Praise in Early Tudor Humanism’, in Mary Tudor: New and Old Perspectives, ed. Susan Doran and Thomas Freeman (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011), 103-22.
  • ‘Versions of the English Bible 1550-1660’, in The Oxford History of Literary Translation in English, Volume 2: 1550-1660, ed. Gordon Braden, Robert Cummings, and Theo Hermans (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 120-40.
  • ‘The Translation of Biblical Commentary 1550-1660’, in The Oxford History of Literary Translation in English, Volume 2: 1550-1660, ed. Gordon Braden, Robert Cummings, and Theo Hermans (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010), 155-63.
  • ‘The Reformation of History in John Bale’s Biblical Dramas’, in English Historical Drama 1500-1660:  Forms Outside the Canon, ed. Teresa Grant and Barbara Ravelhofer (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), 58-97.
  • ‘Between Surrey and Marot: Nicolas Bourbon and the Artful Translation of the Epigram’, Translation and Literature, 15.1 (2006), 1-20.
  • ‘Glass Houses: Surrey, Petrarch, and the Religious Poetics of the London Invective’, The Review of English Studies, 57 (2006), 433-55.
  • Neo-Latin and the Pastoral, ed. and intro. Philip Ford and Andrew Taylor, Canadian Review of Comparative Literature / Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée, 33.1-2 (2006).