Dr Katrin Ettenhuber, Pembroke

 

 

Biographical Information

Katrin was born and raised in Germany and came to Cambridge as an undergraduate, as a scholar of the German National Scholarship Foundation. She spent nine years at Christ’s College as a student and a Research Fellow, before moving to Pembroke, where she is currently a Fellow and Director of Studies in English.

Research Interests

Katrin works mainly on the literary and intellectual culture of sixteenth- and seventeenth-century England. Her areas of specialisation are religious writing – especially in relation to the patristic and medieval sources of Renaissance literature – and the history of rhetoric and dialectic in the early modern period; she has published extensively on both. Her current project, Argument and Assurance, combines these two fields: it’s a study of how humanist and scholastic models of formal argument helped shape the religious writing of the Renaissance.

Areas of Graduate Supervision

Topics relating to research interests (above). Contributes to teaching on the M.Phil. in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Selected Publications

  • The Oxford Edition of the Sermons of John Donne, vol. 5: Sermons Preached at Lincoln’s Inn, 1620-23 (Oxford University Press, 2015); funded by an Early Career Fellowship from the Arts and Humanities Research Council
  • Donne’s Augustine: Renaissance Cultures of Interpretation (Oxford University Press, 2011)
  • Renaissance Figures of Speech, ed. Sylvia Adamson, Gavin Alexander, and Katrin Ettenhuber (Cambridge University Press, 2008). Voted Choice Outstanding Academic Title for 2008
  • ‘“A Comely Gate to So Rich and Glorious a Citie”: The Paratextual Architecture of the Rheims New Testament and the King James Bible’, in The Oxford Handbook to the Early Modern Bible, ed. Kevin Killeen, Helen Smith, and Rachel Willie (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • ‘How to Do Things With Rhetoric’, in Oxford Handbooks Online (Oxford University Press, 2015)
  • ‘English Sermons, 1500-1800’, in The Oxford Guide to the Historical Reception of Augustine, ed. Karla Pollmann et al. (Oxford University Press, 2013)
  • ‘“Tears of Passion” and “Inordinate Lamentation”: Complicated Grief in Donne and Augustine’, in Passions and Subjectivity in Early Modern England, ed. Brian Cummings and Freya Sierhuis (Ashgate, 2013)
  • ‘“Take vp and read the Scriptures”: Patristic Interpretation and the Poetics of Abundance in “The Translators to the Reader”’, Huntington Library Quarterly, 75 (2012)
  • ‘The Preacher and Patristics’, in The Oxford Handbook of the Early Modern Sermon, ed. Hugh Adlington, Peter McCullough, and Emma Rhatigan (Oxford University Press, 2011)
  • ‘“Comparisons are Odious”: Revisiting the Metaphysical Conceit in Donne’, The Review of English Studies; published online 9 November 2010, at res.oxfordjournals.org (published in print vol. 62 (2011))
  • ‘Hyperbole’, in Renaissance Figures of Speech
  • ‘Introduction’ (with Sylvia Adamson and Gavin Alexander), in Renaissance Figures of Speech
  • ‘“Take Heed what you Hear”: Re-reading Donne’s Lincoln’s Inn Sermons’, John Donne Journal, 26 (2007)
  • ‘“The best help God’s people have”: Manuscript Culture and the Construction of Anti-Calvinist Communities in Seventeenth-Century England’, The Seventeenth Century, 22 (2007)
  • ‘Reading and Interpretation’, in John Donne in Context, ed. Michael Schoenfeldt (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2017)
  • ‘Prayer in Context: The Dynamics of Worship in Donne’s Encænia Sermon (1623)’, in Prayer and Performance, ed. Joseph Sterrett (Cambridge University Press, forthcoming 2016)
  • ‘“Keeping the Peace”: Politics and Patristics in Donne’s Whitsunday Sermon of 1629’, in The Church Fathers in Early Modern England, ed. Mitchell M. Harris and Steven Matthews (Toronto University Press, forthcoming 2016)
  • ‘Argufying Revisited: Logic and Rhetoric in Donne’s Poetry’ (in preparation)
  • Reviews for The Review of English Studies, The Times Higher Education Supplement, Early Modern Literary Studies, The Seventeenth Century, Spenser Studies.