Wings, birds, burdens and pricks (1.4.17-28)

MERCUTIO     You are a lover, borrow Cupid’s wings,                         And soar with them above a common bound. ROMEO           I am too sore enpiercèd with his shaft                         To soar with his light feathers, and so bound                         I cannot bound a pitch above dull woe:                         Under love’s heavy burden do I sink. MERCUTIO     And […]

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Mercutio (finally) 1.4.11-16

ROMEO           Give me a torch, I am not for this ambling;                         Being but heavy, I will bear the light. MERCUTIO     Nay, gentle Romeo, we must have you dance. ROMEO           Not I, believe me. You have dancing shoes                         With nimble soles, I have a soul of lead                         So stakes me to the ground […]

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Torches… (1.4.1-10)

Enter ROMEO, MERCUTIO, BENVOLIO, with five or six other MASKERS, TORCH-BEARERS ROMEO           What, shall this speech be spoke for our excuse?                         Or shall we on without apology? BENVOLIO      The date is out of such prolixity:                         We’ll have no Cupid hoodwinked with a scarf,                         Bearing a Tartar’s painted bow of lath,                         Scaring […]

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Happy nights, happy days (1.3.97-106)

LADY CAPULET         Speak briefly, can you like of Paris’ love? JULIET                                    I’ll look to like, if looking liking move;                                     But no more deep will I endart mine eye                                     Than your consent gives strength to make it fly.                                                 Enter SERVINGMAN SERVINGMAN            Madam, the guests are come, supper served up, you called, my young […]

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Books and fish (1.3.90-96)

LADY CAPULET         The fish lives in the sea, and ’tis much pride                                     For fair without the fair within to hide;                                     That book in many’s eyes doth share the glory                                     That in gold clasps locks in the golden story:                                     So shall you share all that he doth possess,                                     By having him, […]

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Book of love (1.3.80-89)

LADY CAPULET         What say you, can you love the gentleman?                                     This night you shall behold him at our feast;                                     Read o’er the volume of young Paris’ face,                                     And find delight writ there with beauty’s pen;                                     Examine every married lineament,                                     And see how one another lends content;                                     And what obscured […]

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A man of wax (1.3.70-79)

LADY CAPULET         Well, think of marriage now; younger than you,                                     Here in Verona, ladies of esteem,                                     Are made already mothers. By my count,                                     I was your mother much upon these years                                     That you are now a maid. Thus then in brief:                                     The valiant Paris seeks you for his love. NURSE                        […]

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Marry is the very theme (1.3.60-69)

NURSE                        Peace, I have done. God mark thee to his grace,                                     Thou wast the prettiest babe that e’er I nursed.                                     And I might live to see thee married once,                                     I have my wish. LADY CAPULET         Marry, that ‘marry’ is the very theme                                     I came to talk of. Tell me, my daughter […]

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Said Ay… (1.3.50-59)

LADY CAPULET         Enough of this, I pray thee hold thy peace. NURSE                        Yes, madam, yet I cannot choose but laugh,                                     To think it should leave crying and say ‘Ay’:                                     And yet I warrant it had upon it brow                                     A bump as big as a young cock’rel’s stone,                                     A perilous knock, and […]

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Falling backward (1.3.34-49)

NURSE            ‘Shake!’ quoth the dove-house; ’twas no need, I trow,                         To bid me trudge.                         And since that time it is eleven years,                         For then she could stand high-lone; nay, by th’rood,                         She could have run and waddled all about;                         For even the day before, she broke her brow,                         And […]

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