Earthquakes and weaning (1.3.24-33)

NURSE            ’Tis since the earthquake now eleven years,                         And she was weaned – I never shall forget it –                         Of all the days of the year, upon that day;                         For I had then laid wormwood to my dug,                         Sitting in the sun under the dove-house wall.                         My lord and you […]

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Lammas-tide, and Susan (1.3.15-23)

NURSE                        How long is it now                                     To Lammas-tide? LADY CAPULET                                             A fortnight and odd days. NURSE                        Even or odd, of all days in the year,                                     Come Lammas-eve at night shall she be fourteen.                                     Susan and she – God rest all Christian souls! –                                     Were of an age. Well, Susan is with […]

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A pretty age (1.3.8-15)

LADY CAPULET         This is the matter. Nurse, give leave a while,                                     We must talk in secret. Nurse, come back again,                                     I have remembered me, thou s’ hear our counsel.                                     Thou knowest my daughter’s of a pretty age. NURSE                        Faith, I can tell her age unto an hour. LADY CAPULET         She’s not fourteen. […]

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Juliet! (1.3.1-7)

Enter CAPULET’S WIFE and NURSE LADY CAPULET         Nurse, where’s my daughter? call her forth to me. NURSE                        Now by my maidenhead at twelve year old, I bade her come. What, lamb! What, ladybird God forbid, where’s this girl? What, Juliet! Enter JULIET JULIET                                    How now, who calls? NURSE                        Your mother. JULIET                                    Madam, I am here, […]

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Reflection on 1.2

The scene division is editorial, and it’s clear that the action is continuous between 1.1 and 1.2; it’s not implausible to imagine it as having happened in real time, given that Capulet goes with the Prince to be admonished half way through 1.1, and then is reporting this to Paris as they enter at the […]

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Splendour of mine own (1.2.94-101)

BENVOLIO      Tut, you saw her fair, none else being by,                         Herself poised with herself in either eye;                         But in that crystal scales let there be weighed                         Your lady’s love against some other maid                         That I will show you shining at this feast,                         And she shall scant show well that now […]

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Devout religion (1.2.88-93)

ROMEO           When the devout religion of mine eye                         Maintains such falsehood, then turn tears to fires;                         And these who, often drowned, could never die,                         Transparent heretics, be burnt for liars.                         One fairer than my love! the all-seeing sun                         Ne’er saw her match since first the world begun. (1.2.88-93)   And […]

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Swans and crows (1.2.82-87)

BENVOLIO      At this same ancient feast of Capulet’s                         Sups the fair Rosaline whom thou so loves                         With all the admirèd beauties of Verona:                         Go thither, and with unattainted eye                         Compare her face with some that I shall show,                         And I will make thee think thy swan a crow. (1.2.82-87)   […]

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Guest list… (1.2.55-81)

ROMEO                                   God-den, good fellow. SERVANT        God gi’ god-den. I pray, sir, can you read? ROMEO           Ay, mine own fortune in my misery. SERVANT        Perhaps you have learned it without book; but I pray, can you read any thing you see? ROMEO           Ay, if I know the letters and the language. SERVANT        Ye say honestly, rest […]

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New infection (1.2.44-55)

Enter BENVOLIO and ROMEO BENVOLIO      Tut, man, one fire burns out another’s burning,                         One pain is lessened by another’s anguish;                         Turn giddy, and be holp by backward turning;                         One desperate grief cures with another’s languish: Take thou some new infection to thy eye,                         And the rank poison of the old will […]

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