Eliza Haughton-Shaw, King's

Degree: PhD
Course: 18CR
Supervisor: Dr Fred Parker
Dissertation Title:

The Wound and the Show: Pain and Eccentricity in Writing by Sterne, Wordsworth, Lamb, and Dickens


Biographical Information

I read for my BA in English Language and Literature at St Anne’s College, Oxford, where I was awarded the Mrs Claude Beddington English Literature Prize and two Gibbs Prizes. In the following year, I took my MLitt in Victorian Literature at the University of Glasgow, before embarking on my doctoral studies at Cambridge University, funded by the AHRC. During 2019, I spent three months working within a SEND school in Cambridge, and am committed to continuing to work in the area of special education. 

Research Interests

My PhD explores representations of eccentrics and eccentricity between the mid-eighteenth and later nineteenth century; it draws on a range of theorists, from David Hume to the psychoanalyst D.W. Winnicott, working on comparable problems around failed or functionally imperfect sympathy with others.

I write mainly on late eighteenth-century and nineteenth literature, both poetry and prose. My research interests include the comic; play and creativity; reverie, dreaming and unproductive states; nonsense; associationism; habit and social character; the history of emotion; British romantic poetry and prose; appetite and anorexia. I have a passionate interest in psychoanalysis (especially Freud, D.W. Winnicott, Marion Milner).

 

Areas of Supervision

At Cambridge, I teach the papers Practical Criticism and Critical Practise; English Literature and its Contexts 1660-1870; Love, Gender, Sexuality 1740-1824; The English Moralists

I have supervised Part 1 and 2 dissertations on nonsense poetry; satire and bodily fluids; Wordsworth’s curatorial impulses. I am always happy to hear from students working on my research interests: ehh24@cam.ac.uk.

Selected Publications

Journal articles:

‘"Antic Dispositions": Lear and Dickens’, Victorian Poetry, 58.2 (2020), 135-149.

‘Charles Lamb’s Imperfect Solitudes’, Romanticism (forthcoming, 2021).

Reviews/Interviews:

'The Eccentricity of Lydia Davis's 'Essays'', The London Magazine (August 2020).

'Emma Donoghue on writing hunger', The London Magazine (February 2020).

'Defying Gravity', review of Not Working: Why We Have to Stop by Josh Cohen (Granta, 2019), The London Magazine (January 2020).

Conferences:

In 2019, I co-organised a two-day conference at King's College, Cambridge on the subject of Happiness: Enlightenment to Present.  In 2021, I co-organised a week-long virtual conference on 'Habit in the Long Eighteenth Century', a summary of which can be found here. With Hannah Tran, I am currently co-editing a symposium of essays on the 'Habit and Romanticism' for The Cambridge Quarterly.