Monthly Archives: June 2015

*Heroes* (CFP)

Heroes
Royal Geographical Society, London, 3rd-4th October 2015

The figure of the hero is a matter of great cultural debate at the present time, in British contexts and beyond. Recent conflicts; natural disasters; ambitious expeditions; Olympic and Paralympic events – all have forged potential hero figures, renewing centuries-old discussions about just who, or what, a hero might be. This two-day conference will draw together academics from a wide variety of disciplines, alongside archivists, curators and librarians, plus colleagues from the commercial and charity sectors. It will foster conversations about hero figures past and present, considering their emergence or creation, their relationship with their fans or ‘worshippers’ in their own communities and/or further afield and, if relevant, the shifting fortunes of their reputations. We ask whether heroes emerge through deeds, character or morality, or whether they are created. We ponder the value of heroes to particular communities in the forging of their group identity. We trace the shaping and maintenance of heroic reputations in texts, art practice, oral culture and curatorship. Across the scope of the conference we seek to ask: who were, or are our heroes, and how/why could or should future heroes be selected or permitted to emerge?

The conference will include the launch of the exhibition ‘Heroes of Exploration,’ which draws attention to heroic records in the collections of the Royal Geographical Society (with IBG), with a particular focus on heroism in mountain and Polar environments.

The organisers invite proposals for papers or panels. The deadline for submission of abstracts is 20 July 2015.

Further information and details of how to submit an abstract are available here.

*Romanticism and the Experience of Experiment* (CRASSH Seminar)

The final seminar of the CRASSH series Rethinking Life will be taking place on Wednesday 10 June, 4pm – 6pm, in Room S1 of the Alison Richard Building.

Robert Mitchell (Professor of English, Duke University) will be speaking via video link on ‘Romanticism and the Experience of Experiment’.

Open to all. No registration required.

*Difficult Women 1680-1830* (CFP)

Difficult Women in the Long Eighteenth Century: 1680-1830
University of York, 28th November 2015

The long eighteenth century witnessed an age of social and political revolution which profoundly affected the way in which women occupied and contributed to the public sphere. This interdisciplinary conference looks at representations and conceptions of ‘difficult women’ from the years 1680-1830. The term ‘difficult women’ encapsulates many different female experiences and lifestyles. From religiously non-conformist women to women bearing arms, a plethora of ‘difficult women’ find representation within the British Empire.

This conference welcomes abstracts and/or proposals for panels on any topic relating to ‘Difficult Women’ throughout the long eighteenth century.

The deadline for submission for proposals is 1 July 2015.

See the official call for papers for more details, including how to submit.