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HISTORY OF MATERIAL TEXTS SEMINAR today!

Thursday 7 March, 5pm, Board Room, Faculty of English
VICTORIA MOUL (University College London)
‘Post-medieval (’neo’-) Latin verse in English manuscript sources, c. 1550-1720’

This talk will present some of the first analysis of a large project surveying for the first time the tens of thousands of post-medieval (i.e. ’neo’) Latin verse preserved in early modern English manuscript sources. This extremely rich and varied material is testament to the profoundly bilingual nature of early modern English literary culture, but has been almost untouched by scholarship, and has never been surveyed before. This presentation will offer an overview of the material, discuss briefly methodology and data analysis involved in a project surveying manuscript sources on this scale, and then focus on emergent findings. Areas of particular interest to other early modernists are likely to include: newly discovered Latin verse by significant figures of the period (such as Andrew Melville); new evidence for the circulation of the Latin work of well-known poets (such as George Herbert); formal and metrical innovations and the relation between formal innovations in Latin and English verse; the prevalence of Latin-English verse translation; and evidence for patterns of readership as well as composition. The talk will be illustrated with slides of some of the c. 1500 manuscripts so far examined, and is likely to be of interest to graduate students and colleagues with an interest in early modern English poetry and literary culture, intellectual history, translation studies, manuscript studies, classical reception and neo-Latin.

All welcome

If you would like to dine with the speaker after the seminar, please let me know (jes1003@cam.ac.uk)
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History of Material Texts Seminar this week

Thursday 7 March, 5pm, Board Room, Faculty of English
VICTORIA MOUL (University College London)

‘Post-medieval (’neo’-) Latin verse in English manuscript sources, c. 1550-1720’
... See MoreSee Less

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