Nina Cnockaert-Guillou, King's

Degree: PhD
Course: ASNC
Supervisor: Prof Máire Ní Mhaonaigh

Biographical Information

I completed my Licence Littératures, Langues, Civilisations Étrangères et Régionales Anglais in La Sorbonne-Nouvelle in Paris (2018), during which I went on an Erasmus study-exchange programme at University College Cork, in Ireland (2017–2018) and obtained a Certificate in Irish Studies (2018).

I stayed in University College Cork for my Masters in Early and Medieval Irish (2018–2019, First Class Honours, with an Excellence Scholarship from the College of Arts). For my MA dissertation, I edited and translated 'Finn and Mac Lesc', a prosimetric Fenian text found in the Book of Leinster (Dublin, Trinity College, MS 1339), Oxford, Bodleian Library, MS Rawlinson B 502 and Dublin, Royal Irish Academy, MS C iii 2. 

During the academic year 2019–2020, I completed a Postgraduate Diploma in Ancient and Medieval Languages in University College Cork (First Class Honours).

I am now a PhD student in Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic (funded by a Cambridge European & King's College Scholarship), and I am working on the story of the three men and the dog of Irúath, found in various manuscripts, including within the narrative of Acallam na Senórach.

I proofread Old and Middle Irish texts for the Irish Sagas Online project (2019–present), and I am also involved in the Association of Celtic Students of Ireland and Britain, as the current social media officer (2019–present).

Research Interests

I am mainly interested in the Irish language and in the Finn Cycle, and particularly in the transmission and reworking of stories in medieval Irish literature. My interests also include Breton language and culture and Arthurian material.

Selected Publications

Cnockaert-Guillou, N.,  'Chasing Mabon: A Study of the Links between Mabonagrain, Evrain and Owein based on Erec et Enide and Gereint uab Erbin', in Proceedings of the Association of Celtic Students of Ireland and Britain: Vol. VII, ed. J. Alba and K. Walker (2020), 107–24.